Your eMedia Vitals this week: 8.5.11

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Need to catch up? Here are the must-read stories for digital media professionals from the last week.

From our staff

The Atlantic iPad app: A new model for publishers?: The Atlantic launched an updated iPad app that merges magazine and Web content. Ellie Behling says it's a sign that magazine and newspaper publishers are exploring new ways to evolve their tablet strategies beyond digital replicas of print products to offer a new type of content hub.

Cosmo apps load up on interactivity: With its new CFG: Cosmo for Guys app, Cosmopolitan extends its emphasis on interactive features (sex quiz, anyone?) to the app world. Early app users 'can't get enough' interactivity, E-I-C Kate White says.

Strike that: How transparent are your correction policies?: Twenty years into the Web, you’d think publishers would have figured out the best way to handle online corrections by now. But Rob O'Regan writes that the issue of how to acknowledge and correct mistakes remains problematic for many of us.

Magazine iPad editions still lack sharing capability: Digital magazine editions on the iPad offer rich media and interactivity, but are still lacking in one key area: social sharing capability. The "walled garden" nature of app content continues to be a valid criticism, according to a recent study.

Newsroom leaders embrace changes and challenges: Editors are taking advantage of new opportunities in the media industry — but they're also frustrated by budget and staffing cuts as they move into the new newsroom, according to a new survey from the American Press Institute and the American Society of News Editors.

Back to the basics: Web optimization tool targets small publishers: Optify launched a Basic Edition of its keyword optimization and lead tracking software. Small publishers such as the San Francisco Bay Area Observer are using it to drive more traffic — without a lot of overhead.

From around the Web

For 'New Yorker' on iPad, words are the thing (The New York Times): Offering the first detailed glimpse into iPad magazine sales since subscriptions became available in the spring, The New Yorker said it now had 100,000 iPad readers, including about 20,000 people who bought subscriptions at $59.99 a year. The figures are the highest of any iPad edition sold by Condé Nast.

Why the pipes are broken in mobile advertising (Ad Age): Mobile advertising is brimming with a lot of little companies — and a couple of big stakeholders like Apple and Google — scrambling to build the infrastructure to make advertising work in a medium that some have said will be bigger than TV. But despite all the excitement, standards are still lacking.

McClatchy profits fall amid industrywide declines (paidContent): The latest Q2 numbers from McClatchy and others raise a number of questions for newspapers: are the profits wrung from the major waves of cost-cutting over the years finally being exhausted? Is more cost-cutting on the way? Are digital gains getting close to offsetting print losses? So far, the answers all seem pretty bleak.

Building a magazine for the digital age (Mashable): Sports Illustrated has alighted upon the best model for a print magazine in the digital age, not only in terms of content and design (i.e. the product itself), but also in the way the publication has organized its staff and workflow to produce consistently top-tier products across multiple platforms. Here's why.

The newsonomics of Netflix and the digital shift (Nieman Journalism Lab): By raising prices on DVD-by-mail subscriptions, Netflix is forcing the shift to digital. The economics of its business is clear: more digital streaming means higher profits. There is great relevance in this transition for news and magazine publishers, although the path is more complex.

A better life through apps, consumers say (min online): This app-mania craze isn't all hype, according to MTV Networks and research firm Latitude. In one of the first research studies to explore how people feel about their apps, the network finds consumers really, really like their mobile downloads. 

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